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Everything You Need to Know About Campfire Cookouts

Everything You Need to Know About Campfire Cookouts


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From building the perfect fire to the ultimate variations on classic s’mores, this fulfills all your campfire cooking needs

Take at least one weekend this summer to spend miles away from home, in the great outdoors. Pack your tent, your sleeping bag, and plenty of food, and head off to the wild countryside or the breezy beach. Pitch your tent, build a campfire, and enjoy a magical evening of flickering flames, charred hot dogs, melted marshmallows, and stargazing. Follow this guide to make sure you’re up to speed with all the campfire cookout essentials, like how to build the fire, what equipment you’ll need to take, the best cooking methods, and our absolute favorite campfire recipes.

Everything You Need to Know About Campfire Cookouts

Take at least one weekend this summer to spend miles away from home, in the great outdoors. Follow this guide to make sure you’re up to speed with all the campfire cookout essentials, like how to build the fire, what equipment you’ll need to take, the best cooking methods, and our absolute favorite campfire recipes.

Building the Campfire

There are a few key tips that will help you build a successful, long-lasting, and stable campfire. Firstly, make sure you wood is dry. If it’s not, not only will it be harder to light, but it will also smoke too much. You’ll need to build your campfire in a pyramid shape to ensure that there’s plenty of space for air to circulate between the logs. Lastly, use a range of wood: Mix together small kindling to get the fire lit and larger logs to burn sustainably.

Campfire Steaming and Boiling

To steam or boil your food, hang a heavy pan full of water over the flames (not in the direct heat of the flames), and either drop your food straight into the water to boil it, or place it in a metal bowl in the water to steam it. Steaming works well for puddings or cakes, as the bowl is insulated from the intense heat of the fire’s embers, just as a cake pan insulates the batter from the oven’s heat when you’re baking at home.

Cooking on a Stick

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This is definitely the easiest way to cook over a campfire, although the foods you can do this with are limited. Use a long-handled skewer, stick, or fork, pierce sausages, marshmallows, or bread for toasting, and hold it slightly above the flames so that the food warms, without catching fire.

Coffee Can Cooking

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To make a hearty campfire stew, the coffee can cooking technique is your best option. Take a coffee can, layer your food into it, seal the top of it with aluminum foil, and place the can into the fire’s coals. Cook your food for 30-45 minutes, before carefully removing the can from the fire (you’ll need sturdy gloves to do this), and eating immediately.

Foil-Packed Cooking

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Also known as hobo cooking, or silver turtle cooking, this is one of the most versatile campfire cooking methods. Place all the ingredients for your meal in the foil, wrap it up tightly, crimping the edges of the foil together, and cook slowly on the wood or coals, until bubbling, smoky, and ready to eat.

Essential Campfire Cooking Equipment

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Before you set out on your adventure, make sure you’re well equipped with the essential cooking equipment. The most important items you’ll need are a cast iron skillet, a grill sheet, plenty of heavy-duty aluminum foil, long-handled forks, sturdy gloves, tongs, a heatproof pan or pot (preferably with a lid), a food thermometer, and a Thermos flask, for keeping boiled water warm.

Campfire Corn on the Cob

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Campfire Pancakes

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Campfire Popcorn

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Wrap popcorn kernels, oil, and salt or sugar (to your own taste) in a large piece of tinfoil. Crimp the edges of the foil together, making sure it’s not tight around the kernels they need room to pop. Poke a campfire fork through the crimped edge of the foil packet, and hold it above the flames, shaking gently every now and again. Remove from the flames once the popping sound has stopped.

Campfire Roasted Caramel Peaches With Pecans

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DIY Instant Oatmeal With Nut Butter

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Fire-Roasted Salmon With Herbs and Lemon

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Hot Cocoa

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There’s nothing better than ending a hearty campfire meal, cozied up around the dwindling flames, with a mug of warm cocoa. Pack your favorite hot chocolate mix, warm the milk in your pan, and top with toasted marshmallows.

Hot Dogs

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Cooking hot dogs over a campfire couldn’t be easier. Simple stick them onto a long-handled skewer or fork, and hover them just above the flames until they are hot, cooked-through, and lightly charred. Serve alone, or in hot dog buns, topped with your favorite condiments.

Mixed Mushroom Hobo Pack

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S’mores and Their Best Variations

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Toasty Bacon Fluffernutters

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Ultimate Campfire Breakfast

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Hobo Meals for Camping: 8 Tin Foil Recipes You’ll Love

Foil packet meals, or hobo meals for camping have been cooked over a campfire for as long as I can remember. It’s one of the first things you learn how to do in the Boy Scouts , and knowing how to throw together a meal and cook it in tin foil will continue to help you out for as long as you go camping.

In this post, I have put together 8 of the easiest, and best-tasting hobo meals for camping. Hobo meals are another term for foil packet meals. It’s a term used mostly in the States, so for those of my readers outside of the States who arae not familiar with the term ‘Hobo Meal’, as described in the Urban Dictionary it means:

When you have no plates or dishes to cook with. Typically when camping.

Even if you do have plates and dishes, using foil to cook can make meal time a lot more fun and quicker. For me, it captures some of the true essence of camping. Taking ingredients, wrapping them in tinfoil to make a parcel, and placing it on the hot coals of a campfire to cook.

You can prepare some meals before leaving home and have them ready to go, or just as easily put them together when the fire is roaring. Another thing that’s appealing about hobo meals for me is no cleaning up afterwards! No scrubbing fat off a drip tray, no dirty pots and pans, just some foil to pack away.

With more than enough reasons to cook some foil pack meals, here is everything you need to know, and some of the tastiest recipes you’ll come across.

Useful Tips When Making Foil Packet Meals

  • Spray the inside of the foil with a little cooking oil otherwise the food will stick and it’ll be a mess when opening it up.
  • Use good quality foil, hobo meals are inexpensive but don’t cut corners on the foil or the pack might split when cooking.
  • Canned vegetables are a lot softer than raw and will cook much quicker.
  • Turn the foil packs a few times while cooking and always open and look at the food before eating to make sure it’s cooked.

Hobo Meals for Camping: 8 Tin Foil Recipes You’ll Love

Foil packet meals, or hobo meals for camping have been cooked over a campfire for as long as I can remember. It’s one of the first things you learn how to do in the Boy Scouts , and knowing how to throw together a meal and cook it in tin foil will continue to help you out for as long as you go camping.

In this post, I have put together 8 of the easiest, and best-tasting hobo meals for camping. Hobo meals are another term for foil packet meals. It’s a term used mostly in the States, so for those of my readers outside of the States who arae not familiar with the term ‘Hobo Meal’, as described in the Urban Dictionary it means:

When you have no plates or dishes to cook with. Typically when camping.

Even if you do have plates and dishes, using foil to cook can make meal time a lot more fun and quicker. For me, it captures some of the true essence of camping. Taking ingredients, wrapping them in tinfoil to make a parcel, and placing it on the hot coals of a campfire to cook.

You can prepare some meals before leaving home and have them ready to go, or just as easily put them together when the fire is roaring. Another thing that’s appealing about hobo meals for me is no cleaning up afterwards! No scrubbing fat off a drip tray, no dirty pots and pans, just some foil to pack away.

With more than enough reasons to cook some foil pack meals, here is everything you need to know, and some of the tastiest recipes you’ll come across.

Useful Tips When Making Foil Packet Meals

  • Spray the inside of the foil with a little cooking oil otherwise the food will stick and it’ll be a mess when opening it up.
  • Use good quality foil, hobo meals are inexpensive but don’t cut corners on the foil or the pack might split when cooking.
  • Canned vegetables are a lot softer than raw and will cook much quicker.
  • Turn the foil packs a few times while cooking and always open and look at the food before eating to make sure it’s cooked.

Hobo Meals for Camping: 8 Tin Foil Recipes You’ll Love

Foil packet meals, or hobo meals for camping have been cooked over a campfire for as long as I can remember. It’s one of the first things you learn how to do in the Boy Scouts , and knowing how to throw together a meal and cook it in tin foil will continue to help you out for as long as you go camping.

In this post, I have put together 8 of the easiest, and best-tasting hobo meals for camping. Hobo meals are another term for foil packet meals. It’s a term used mostly in the States, so for those of my readers outside of the States who arae not familiar with the term ‘Hobo Meal’, as described in the Urban Dictionary it means:

When you have no plates or dishes to cook with. Typically when camping.

Even if you do have plates and dishes, using foil to cook can make meal time a lot more fun and quicker. For me, it captures some of the true essence of camping. Taking ingredients, wrapping them in tinfoil to make a parcel, and placing it on the hot coals of a campfire to cook.

You can prepare some meals before leaving home and have them ready to go, or just as easily put them together when the fire is roaring. Another thing that’s appealing about hobo meals for me is no cleaning up afterwards! No scrubbing fat off a drip tray, no dirty pots and pans, just some foil to pack away.

With more than enough reasons to cook some foil pack meals, here is everything you need to know, and some of the tastiest recipes you’ll come across.

Useful Tips When Making Foil Packet Meals

  • Spray the inside of the foil with a little cooking oil otherwise the food will stick and it’ll be a mess when opening it up.
  • Use good quality foil, hobo meals are inexpensive but don’t cut corners on the foil or the pack might split when cooking.
  • Canned vegetables are a lot softer than raw and will cook much quicker.
  • Turn the foil packs a few times while cooking and always open and look at the food before eating to make sure it’s cooked.

Hobo Meals for Camping: 8 Tin Foil Recipes You’ll Love

Foil packet meals, or hobo meals for camping have been cooked over a campfire for as long as I can remember. It’s one of the first things you learn how to do in the Boy Scouts , and knowing how to throw together a meal and cook it in tin foil will continue to help you out for as long as you go camping.

In this post, I have put together 8 of the easiest, and best-tasting hobo meals for camping. Hobo meals are another term for foil packet meals. It’s a term used mostly in the States, so for those of my readers outside of the States who arae not familiar with the term ‘Hobo Meal’, as described in the Urban Dictionary it means:

When you have no plates or dishes to cook with. Typically when camping.

Even if you do have plates and dishes, using foil to cook can make meal time a lot more fun and quicker. For me, it captures some of the true essence of camping. Taking ingredients, wrapping them in tinfoil to make a parcel, and placing it on the hot coals of a campfire to cook.

You can prepare some meals before leaving home and have them ready to go, or just as easily put them together when the fire is roaring. Another thing that’s appealing about hobo meals for me is no cleaning up afterwards! No scrubbing fat off a drip tray, no dirty pots and pans, just some foil to pack away.

With more than enough reasons to cook some foil pack meals, here is everything you need to know, and some of the tastiest recipes you’ll come across.

Useful Tips When Making Foil Packet Meals

  • Spray the inside of the foil with a little cooking oil otherwise the food will stick and it’ll be a mess when opening it up.
  • Use good quality foil, hobo meals are inexpensive but don’t cut corners on the foil or the pack might split when cooking.
  • Canned vegetables are a lot softer than raw and will cook much quicker.
  • Turn the foil packs a few times while cooking and always open and look at the food before eating to make sure it’s cooked.

Hobo Meals for Camping: 8 Tin Foil Recipes You’ll Love

Foil packet meals, or hobo meals for camping have been cooked over a campfire for as long as I can remember. It’s one of the first things you learn how to do in the Boy Scouts , and knowing how to throw together a meal and cook it in tin foil will continue to help you out for as long as you go camping.

In this post, I have put together 8 of the easiest, and best-tasting hobo meals for camping. Hobo meals are another term for foil packet meals. It’s a term used mostly in the States, so for those of my readers outside of the States who arae not familiar with the term ‘Hobo Meal’, as described in the Urban Dictionary it means:

When you have no plates or dishes to cook with. Typically when camping.

Even if you do have plates and dishes, using foil to cook can make meal time a lot more fun and quicker. For me, it captures some of the true essence of camping. Taking ingredients, wrapping them in tinfoil to make a parcel, and placing it on the hot coals of a campfire to cook.

You can prepare some meals before leaving home and have them ready to go, or just as easily put them together when the fire is roaring. Another thing that’s appealing about hobo meals for me is no cleaning up afterwards! No scrubbing fat off a drip tray, no dirty pots and pans, just some foil to pack away.

With more than enough reasons to cook some foil pack meals, here is everything you need to know, and some of the tastiest recipes you’ll come across.

Useful Tips When Making Foil Packet Meals

  • Spray the inside of the foil with a little cooking oil otherwise the food will stick and it’ll be a mess when opening it up.
  • Use good quality foil, hobo meals are inexpensive but don’t cut corners on the foil or the pack might split when cooking.
  • Canned vegetables are a lot softer than raw and will cook much quicker.
  • Turn the foil packs a few times while cooking and always open and look at the food before eating to make sure it’s cooked.

Hobo Meals for Camping: 8 Tin Foil Recipes You’ll Love

Foil packet meals, or hobo meals for camping have been cooked over a campfire for as long as I can remember. It’s one of the first things you learn how to do in the Boy Scouts , and knowing how to throw together a meal and cook it in tin foil will continue to help you out for as long as you go camping.

In this post, I have put together 8 of the easiest, and best-tasting hobo meals for camping. Hobo meals are another term for foil packet meals. It’s a term used mostly in the States, so for those of my readers outside of the States who arae not familiar with the term ‘Hobo Meal’, as described in the Urban Dictionary it means:

When you have no plates or dishes to cook with. Typically when camping.

Even if you do have plates and dishes, using foil to cook can make meal time a lot more fun and quicker. For me, it captures some of the true essence of camping. Taking ingredients, wrapping them in tinfoil to make a parcel, and placing it on the hot coals of a campfire to cook.

You can prepare some meals before leaving home and have them ready to go, or just as easily put them together when the fire is roaring. Another thing that’s appealing about hobo meals for me is no cleaning up afterwards! No scrubbing fat off a drip tray, no dirty pots and pans, just some foil to pack away.

With more than enough reasons to cook some foil pack meals, here is everything you need to know, and some of the tastiest recipes you’ll come across.

Useful Tips When Making Foil Packet Meals

  • Spray the inside of the foil with a little cooking oil otherwise the food will stick and it’ll be a mess when opening it up.
  • Use good quality foil, hobo meals are inexpensive but don’t cut corners on the foil or the pack might split when cooking.
  • Canned vegetables are a lot softer than raw and will cook much quicker.
  • Turn the foil packs a few times while cooking and always open and look at the food before eating to make sure it’s cooked.

Hobo Meals for Camping: 8 Tin Foil Recipes You’ll Love

Foil packet meals, or hobo meals for camping have been cooked over a campfire for as long as I can remember. It’s one of the first things you learn how to do in the Boy Scouts , and knowing how to throw together a meal and cook it in tin foil will continue to help you out for as long as you go camping.

In this post, I have put together 8 of the easiest, and best-tasting hobo meals for camping. Hobo meals are another term for foil packet meals. It’s a term used mostly in the States, so for those of my readers outside of the States who arae not familiar with the term ‘Hobo Meal’, as described in the Urban Dictionary it means:

When you have no plates or dishes to cook with. Typically when camping.

Even if you do have plates and dishes, using foil to cook can make meal time a lot more fun and quicker. For me, it captures some of the true essence of camping. Taking ingredients, wrapping them in tinfoil to make a parcel, and placing it on the hot coals of a campfire to cook.

You can prepare some meals before leaving home and have them ready to go, or just as easily put them together when the fire is roaring. Another thing that’s appealing about hobo meals for me is no cleaning up afterwards! No scrubbing fat off a drip tray, no dirty pots and pans, just some foil to pack away.

With more than enough reasons to cook some foil pack meals, here is everything you need to know, and some of the tastiest recipes you’ll come across.

Useful Tips When Making Foil Packet Meals

  • Spray the inside of the foil with a little cooking oil otherwise the food will stick and it’ll be a mess when opening it up.
  • Use good quality foil, hobo meals are inexpensive but don’t cut corners on the foil or the pack might split when cooking.
  • Canned vegetables are a lot softer than raw and will cook much quicker.
  • Turn the foil packs a few times while cooking and always open and look at the food before eating to make sure it’s cooked.

Hobo Meals for Camping: 8 Tin Foil Recipes You’ll Love

Foil packet meals, or hobo meals for camping have been cooked over a campfire for as long as I can remember. It’s one of the first things you learn how to do in the Boy Scouts , and knowing how to throw together a meal and cook it in tin foil will continue to help you out for as long as you go camping.

In this post, I have put together 8 of the easiest, and best-tasting hobo meals for camping. Hobo meals are another term for foil packet meals. It’s a term used mostly in the States, so for those of my readers outside of the States who arae not familiar with the term ‘Hobo Meal’, as described in the Urban Dictionary it means:

When you have no plates or dishes to cook with. Typically when camping.

Even if you do have plates and dishes, using foil to cook can make meal time a lot more fun and quicker. For me, it captures some of the true essence of camping. Taking ingredients, wrapping them in tinfoil to make a parcel, and placing it on the hot coals of a campfire to cook.

You can prepare some meals before leaving home and have them ready to go, or just as easily put them together when the fire is roaring. Another thing that’s appealing about hobo meals for me is no cleaning up afterwards! No scrubbing fat off a drip tray, no dirty pots and pans, just some foil to pack away.

With more than enough reasons to cook some foil pack meals, here is everything you need to know, and some of the tastiest recipes you’ll come across.

Useful Tips When Making Foil Packet Meals

  • Spray the inside of the foil with a little cooking oil otherwise the food will stick and it’ll be a mess when opening it up.
  • Use good quality foil, hobo meals are inexpensive but don’t cut corners on the foil or the pack might split when cooking.
  • Canned vegetables are a lot softer than raw and will cook much quicker.
  • Turn the foil packs a few times while cooking and always open and look at the food before eating to make sure it’s cooked.

Hobo Meals for Camping: 8 Tin Foil Recipes You’ll Love

Foil packet meals, or hobo meals for camping have been cooked over a campfire for as long as I can remember. It’s one of the first things you learn how to do in the Boy Scouts , and knowing how to throw together a meal and cook it in tin foil will continue to help you out for as long as you go camping.

In this post, I have put together 8 of the easiest, and best-tasting hobo meals for camping. Hobo meals are another term for foil packet meals. It’s a term used mostly in the States, so for those of my readers outside of the States who arae not familiar with the term ‘Hobo Meal’, as described in the Urban Dictionary it means:

When you have no plates or dishes to cook with. Typically when camping.

Even if you do have plates and dishes, using foil to cook can make meal time a lot more fun and quicker. For me, it captures some of the true essence of camping. Taking ingredients, wrapping them in tinfoil to make a parcel, and placing it on the hot coals of a campfire to cook.

You can prepare some meals before leaving home and have them ready to go, or just as easily put them together when the fire is roaring. Another thing that’s appealing about hobo meals for me is no cleaning up afterwards! No scrubbing fat off a drip tray, no dirty pots and pans, just some foil to pack away.

With more than enough reasons to cook some foil pack meals, here is everything you need to know, and some of the tastiest recipes you’ll come across.

Useful Tips When Making Foil Packet Meals

  • Spray the inside of the foil with a little cooking oil otherwise the food will stick and it’ll be a mess when opening it up.
  • Use good quality foil, hobo meals are inexpensive but don’t cut corners on the foil or the pack might split when cooking.
  • Canned vegetables are a lot softer than raw and will cook much quicker.
  • Turn the foil packs a few times while cooking and always open and look at the food before eating to make sure it’s cooked.

Hobo Meals for Camping: 8 Tin Foil Recipes You’ll Love

Foil packet meals, or hobo meals for camping have been cooked over a campfire for as long as I can remember. It’s one of the first things you learn how to do in the Boy Scouts , and knowing how to throw together a meal and cook it in tin foil will continue to help you out for as long as you go camping.

In this post, I have put together 8 of the easiest, and best-tasting hobo meals for camping. Hobo meals are another term for foil packet meals. It’s a term used mostly in the States, so for those of my readers outside of the States who arae not familiar with the term ‘Hobo Meal’, as described in the Urban Dictionary it means:

When you have no plates or dishes to cook with. Typically when camping.

Even if you do have plates and dishes, using foil to cook can make meal time a lot more fun and quicker. For me, it captures some of the true essence of camping. Taking ingredients, wrapping them in tinfoil to make a parcel, and placing it on the hot coals of a campfire to cook.

You can prepare some meals before leaving home and have them ready to go, or just as easily put them together when the fire is roaring. Another thing that’s appealing about hobo meals for me is no cleaning up afterwards! No scrubbing fat off a drip tray, no dirty pots and pans, just some foil to pack away.

With more than enough reasons to cook some foil pack meals, here is everything you need to know, and some of the tastiest recipes you’ll come across.

Useful Tips When Making Foil Packet Meals

  • Spray the inside of the foil with a little cooking oil otherwise the food will stick and it’ll be a mess when opening it up.
  • Use good quality foil, hobo meals are inexpensive but don’t cut corners on the foil or the pack might split when cooking.
  • Canned vegetables are a lot softer than raw and will cook much quicker.
  • Turn the foil packs a few times while cooking and always open and look at the food before eating to make sure it’s cooked.


Watch the video: Silver Turtles aka Hobo Pockets - BEST Campfire Food!! (May 2022).