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'Bowser Beer' Made for Dogs

'Bowser Beer' Made for Dogs


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Seattle company makes dog-friendly brews

It's wine for French bulldogs, and brews for other pups: one Seattle company is making headlines with its Bowser Beer, a dog-friendly brew that's a real treat.

The story goes that maker Jenny Brown felt that beer would be the perfect complement to her pretzel dog treats, reports the Pioneer Press. She told the Pioneer Press, "It just seemed like the dogs would want a beer with their pretzels." (We would love to know how she did her market research). After two years of testing recipes, she created two flavors — Beefy Brown Ale and Cock-a-Doodle-Brew — to offer her four-legged customers.

Animal rights activists need not worry: it's not an actual beer. In fact, the carbonation and hops of regular beer can be a toxic combination for pooches. Instead, Bowser Beer is a meaty broth made with USDA beef and chicken, barley, added vitamins, and glucosamine for dog's health. Brown said it can be enjoyed on its own, or poured on top of food for a sweet treat.

The retail website for Bowser Beer also has personalized beer bottle labels to really give your pup the full-on beer experience (and yes, the "I Don't Give a Shitzu Brew" is far too adorable). In Minneapolis, one dog-grooming business plans to feature the brew in a dog-friendly lounge during next weekend's gay pride parade.


Spent Grain Dog Treats

Beer fills in the cracks of our human bonds to make them stronger. It gives an elasticity to tested nerves and smooths the wrinkles creased by fraught days. Bristly attitudes subside. Smiles grow and widen. It brings an air of commonality between those of an opposite nature, and rounds the edges of social interaction. It’s only natural to want to apply this magical brew to all of life’s relationships, even with those of other species.

And what species would be more deserving than dogs? Don’t go filling Fido’s dish with ale just yet. It’s extremely important to know hops are poisonous to dogs. That means no brewskies for Doggo. While hops are typically not attractive to canines, the sweet spent grain left over from the mash during the brewing process, is. Spent hops and grain are disposed of after a brew day, ending up in the compost pile or the garbage. If WoofWoof decides to snack on your mixed spent brewing ingredients, the results could be deadly. But there is a way to give your faithful friend what she wants without the unwanted side effects.

Hops: great for people, bad for dogs!

The brewing process begins with adding hot water to malt, which can include barley, wheat, rye, and oats, among other grains. After the grains have steeped in the hot water for a certain period of time (called the mash rest), the liquid (wort) is separated from the grains and transferred to the boil kettle. At this time, the grains have been “spent”, or completed their purpose for the brewing process. So long as the spent grains have been kept separate from hops, they’re safe for dog consumption. Spent grains are about 20% protein and 70% fiber, making it an ideal food source for farm animals, or for crafting fine treats for your best four-legged friend!


Spent Grain Dog Treats

Beer fills in the cracks of our human bonds to make them stronger. It gives an elasticity to tested nerves and smooths the wrinkles creased by fraught days. Bristly attitudes subside. Smiles grow and widen. It brings an air of commonality between those of an opposite nature, and rounds the edges of social interaction. It’s only natural to want to apply this magical brew to all of life’s relationships, even with those of other species.

And what species would be more deserving than dogs? Don’t go filling Fido’s dish with ale just yet. It’s extremely important to know hops are poisonous to dogs. That means no brewskies for Doggo. While hops are typically not attractive to canines, the sweet spent grain left over from the mash during the brewing process, is. Spent hops and grain are disposed of after a brew day, ending up in the compost pile or the garbage. If WoofWoof decides to snack on your mixed spent brewing ingredients, the results could be deadly. But there is a way to give your faithful friend what she wants without the unwanted side effects.

Hops: great for people, bad for dogs!

The brewing process begins with adding hot water to malt, which can include barley, wheat, rye, and oats, among other grains. After the grains have steeped in the hot water for a certain period of time (called the mash rest), the liquid (wort) is separated from the grains and transferred to the boil kettle. At this time, the grains have been “spent”, or completed their purpose for the brewing process. So long as the spent grains have been kept separate from hops, they’re safe for dog consumption. Spent grains are about 20% protein and 70% fiber, making it an ideal food source for farm animals, or for crafting fine treats for your best four-legged friend!


Spent Grain Dog Treats

Beer fills in the cracks of our human bonds to make them stronger. It gives an elasticity to tested nerves and smooths the wrinkles creased by fraught days. Bristly attitudes subside. Smiles grow and widen. It brings an air of commonality between those of an opposite nature, and rounds the edges of social interaction. It’s only natural to want to apply this magical brew to all of life’s relationships, even with those of other species.

And what species would be more deserving than dogs? Don’t go filling Fido’s dish with ale just yet. It’s extremely important to know hops are poisonous to dogs. That means no brewskies for Doggo. While hops are typically not attractive to canines, the sweet spent grain left over from the mash during the brewing process, is. Spent hops and grain are disposed of after a brew day, ending up in the compost pile or the garbage. If WoofWoof decides to snack on your mixed spent brewing ingredients, the results could be deadly. But there is a way to give your faithful friend what she wants without the unwanted side effects.

Hops: great for people, bad for dogs!

The brewing process begins with adding hot water to malt, which can include barley, wheat, rye, and oats, among other grains. After the grains have steeped in the hot water for a certain period of time (called the mash rest), the liquid (wort) is separated from the grains and transferred to the boil kettle. At this time, the grains have been “spent”, or completed their purpose for the brewing process. So long as the spent grains have been kept separate from hops, they’re safe for dog consumption. Spent grains are about 20% protein and 70% fiber, making it an ideal food source for farm animals, or for crafting fine treats for your best four-legged friend!


Spent Grain Dog Treats

Beer fills in the cracks of our human bonds to make them stronger. It gives an elasticity to tested nerves and smooths the wrinkles creased by fraught days. Bristly attitudes subside. Smiles grow and widen. It brings an air of commonality between those of an opposite nature, and rounds the edges of social interaction. It’s only natural to want to apply this magical brew to all of life’s relationships, even with those of other species.

And what species would be more deserving than dogs? Don’t go filling Fido’s dish with ale just yet. It’s extremely important to know hops are poisonous to dogs. That means no brewskies for Doggo. While hops are typically not attractive to canines, the sweet spent grain left over from the mash during the brewing process, is. Spent hops and grain are disposed of after a brew day, ending up in the compost pile or the garbage. If WoofWoof decides to snack on your mixed spent brewing ingredients, the results could be deadly. But there is a way to give your faithful friend what she wants without the unwanted side effects.

Hops: great for people, bad for dogs!

The brewing process begins with adding hot water to malt, which can include barley, wheat, rye, and oats, among other grains. After the grains have steeped in the hot water for a certain period of time (called the mash rest), the liquid (wort) is separated from the grains and transferred to the boil kettle. At this time, the grains have been “spent”, or completed their purpose for the brewing process. So long as the spent grains have been kept separate from hops, they’re safe for dog consumption. Spent grains are about 20% protein and 70% fiber, making it an ideal food source for farm animals, or for crafting fine treats for your best four-legged friend!


Spent Grain Dog Treats

Beer fills in the cracks of our human bonds to make them stronger. It gives an elasticity to tested nerves and smooths the wrinkles creased by fraught days. Bristly attitudes subside. Smiles grow and widen. It brings an air of commonality between those of an opposite nature, and rounds the edges of social interaction. It’s only natural to want to apply this magical brew to all of life’s relationships, even with those of other species.

And what species would be more deserving than dogs? Don’t go filling Fido’s dish with ale just yet. It’s extremely important to know hops are poisonous to dogs. That means no brewskies for Doggo. While hops are typically not attractive to canines, the sweet spent grain left over from the mash during the brewing process, is. Spent hops and grain are disposed of after a brew day, ending up in the compost pile or the garbage. If WoofWoof decides to snack on your mixed spent brewing ingredients, the results could be deadly. But there is a way to give your faithful friend what she wants without the unwanted side effects.

Hops: great for people, bad for dogs!

The brewing process begins with adding hot water to malt, which can include barley, wheat, rye, and oats, among other grains. After the grains have steeped in the hot water for a certain period of time (called the mash rest), the liquid (wort) is separated from the grains and transferred to the boil kettle. At this time, the grains have been “spent”, or completed their purpose for the brewing process. So long as the spent grains have been kept separate from hops, they’re safe for dog consumption. Spent grains are about 20% protein and 70% fiber, making it an ideal food source for farm animals, or for crafting fine treats for your best four-legged friend!


Spent Grain Dog Treats

Beer fills in the cracks of our human bonds to make them stronger. It gives an elasticity to tested nerves and smooths the wrinkles creased by fraught days. Bristly attitudes subside. Smiles grow and widen. It brings an air of commonality between those of an opposite nature, and rounds the edges of social interaction. It’s only natural to want to apply this magical brew to all of life’s relationships, even with those of other species.

And what species would be more deserving than dogs? Don’t go filling Fido’s dish with ale just yet. It’s extremely important to know hops are poisonous to dogs. That means no brewskies for Doggo. While hops are typically not attractive to canines, the sweet spent grain left over from the mash during the brewing process, is. Spent hops and grain are disposed of after a brew day, ending up in the compost pile or the garbage. If WoofWoof decides to snack on your mixed spent brewing ingredients, the results could be deadly. But there is a way to give your faithful friend what she wants without the unwanted side effects.

Hops: great for people, bad for dogs!

The brewing process begins with adding hot water to malt, which can include barley, wheat, rye, and oats, among other grains. After the grains have steeped in the hot water for a certain period of time (called the mash rest), the liquid (wort) is separated from the grains and transferred to the boil kettle. At this time, the grains have been “spent”, or completed their purpose for the brewing process. So long as the spent grains have been kept separate from hops, they’re safe for dog consumption. Spent grains are about 20% protein and 70% fiber, making it an ideal food source for farm animals, or for crafting fine treats for your best four-legged friend!


Spent Grain Dog Treats

Beer fills in the cracks of our human bonds to make them stronger. It gives an elasticity to tested nerves and smooths the wrinkles creased by fraught days. Bristly attitudes subside. Smiles grow and widen. It brings an air of commonality between those of an opposite nature, and rounds the edges of social interaction. It’s only natural to want to apply this magical brew to all of life’s relationships, even with those of other species.

And what species would be more deserving than dogs? Don’t go filling Fido’s dish with ale just yet. It’s extremely important to know hops are poisonous to dogs. That means no brewskies for Doggo. While hops are typically not attractive to canines, the sweet spent grain left over from the mash during the brewing process, is. Spent hops and grain are disposed of after a brew day, ending up in the compost pile or the garbage. If WoofWoof decides to snack on your mixed spent brewing ingredients, the results could be deadly. But there is a way to give your faithful friend what she wants without the unwanted side effects.

Hops: great for people, bad for dogs!

The brewing process begins with adding hot water to malt, which can include barley, wheat, rye, and oats, among other grains. After the grains have steeped in the hot water for a certain period of time (called the mash rest), the liquid (wort) is separated from the grains and transferred to the boil kettle. At this time, the grains have been “spent”, or completed their purpose for the brewing process. So long as the spent grains have been kept separate from hops, they’re safe for dog consumption. Spent grains are about 20% protein and 70% fiber, making it an ideal food source for farm animals, or for crafting fine treats for your best four-legged friend!


Spent Grain Dog Treats

Beer fills in the cracks of our human bonds to make them stronger. It gives an elasticity to tested nerves and smooths the wrinkles creased by fraught days. Bristly attitudes subside. Smiles grow and widen. It brings an air of commonality between those of an opposite nature, and rounds the edges of social interaction. It’s only natural to want to apply this magical brew to all of life’s relationships, even with those of other species.

And what species would be more deserving than dogs? Don’t go filling Fido’s dish with ale just yet. It’s extremely important to know hops are poisonous to dogs. That means no brewskies for Doggo. While hops are typically not attractive to canines, the sweet spent grain left over from the mash during the brewing process, is. Spent hops and grain are disposed of after a brew day, ending up in the compost pile or the garbage. If WoofWoof decides to snack on your mixed spent brewing ingredients, the results could be deadly. But there is a way to give your faithful friend what she wants without the unwanted side effects.

Hops: great for people, bad for dogs!

The brewing process begins with adding hot water to malt, which can include barley, wheat, rye, and oats, among other grains. After the grains have steeped in the hot water for a certain period of time (called the mash rest), the liquid (wort) is separated from the grains and transferred to the boil kettle. At this time, the grains have been “spent”, or completed their purpose for the brewing process. So long as the spent grains have been kept separate from hops, they’re safe for dog consumption. Spent grains are about 20% protein and 70% fiber, making it an ideal food source for farm animals, or for crafting fine treats for your best four-legged friend!


Spent Grain Dog Treats

Beer fills in the cracks of our human bonds to make them stronger. It gives an elasticity to tested nerves and smooths the wrinkles creased by fraught days. Bristly attitudes subside. Smiles grow and widen. It brings an air of commonality between those of an opposite nature, and rounds the edges of social interaction. It’s only natural to want to apply this magical brew to all of life’s relationships, even with those of other species.

And what species would be more deserving than dogs? Don’t go filling Fido’s dish with ale just yet. It’s extremely important to know hops are poisonous to dogs. That means no brewskies for Doggo. While hops are typically not attractive to canines, the sweet spent grain left over from the mash during the brewing process, is. Spent hops and grain are disposed of after a brew day, ending up in the compost pile or the garbage. If WoofWoof decides to snack on your mixed spent brewing ingredients, the results could be deadly. But there is a way to give your faithful friend what she wants without the unwanted side effects.

Hops: great for people, bad for dogs!

The brewing process begins with adding hot water to malt, which can include barley, wheat, rye, and oats, among other grains. After the grains have steeped in the hot water for a certain period of time (called the mash rest), the liquid (wort) is separated from the grains and transferred to the boil kettle. At this time, the grains have been “spent”, or completed their purpose for the brewing process. So long as the spent grains have been kept separate from hops, they’re safe for dog consumption. Spent grains are about 20% protein and 70% fiber, making it an ideal food source for farm animals, or for crafting fine treats for your best four-legged friend!


Spent Grain Dog Treats

Beer fills in the cracks of our human bonds to make them stronger. It gives an elasticity to tested nerves and smooths the wrinkles creased by fraught days. Bristly attitudes subside. Smiles grow and widen. It brings an air of commonality between those of an opposite nature, and rounds the edges of social interaction. It’s only natural to want to apply this magical brew to all of life’s relationships, even with those of other species.

And what species would be more deserving than dogs? Don’t go filling Fido’s dish with ale just yet. It’s extremely important to know hops are poisonous to dogs. That means no brewskies for Doggo. While hops are typically not attractive to canines, the sweet spent grain left over from the mash during the brewing process, is. Spent hops and grain are disposed of after a brew day, ending up in the compost pile or the garbage. If WoofWoof decides to snack on your mixed spent brewing ingredients, the results could be deadly. But there is a way to give your faithful friend what she wants without the unwanted side effects.

Hops: great for people, bad for dogs!

The brewing process begins with adding hot water to malt, which can include barley, wheat, rye, and oats, among other grains. After the grains have steeped in the hot water for a certain period of time (called the mash rest), the liquid (wort) is separated from the grains and transferred to the boil kettle. At this time, the grains have been “spent”, or completed their purpose for the brewing process. So long as the spent grains have been kept separate from hops, they’re safe for dog consumption. Spent grains are about 20% protein and 70% fiber, making it an ideal food source for farm animals, or for crafting fine treats for your best four-legged friend!


Watch the video: Bowser Beer - a beverage for dogs (July 2022).


Comments:

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